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ICTM & SOUNDshift Daily Events (16 July)

July 15, 2011

ICTM + SOUNDshift events open to the public

Saturday, July 16

 

 

WORKSHOPS ($10 each or 3 for $20)

  • 3:30 pm-5:00 pm
    • Portuguese Fado Demonstration/Performance – Nathalie Pires (Irwin’s Court)
    • Aboriginal Hip Hop 101 – The Scott Collegiate/IMP Labs Hip Hop Project (MMAP Gallery)
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ICTM & SOUNDshift Daily Events (15 July)

July 14, 2011

ICTM + SOUNDshift events open to the public

Friday, July 15

 

 

 

CONCERT (tickets $25/15)

WORKSHOPS (tickets $10 each or 3 for $20)

  • 10:30 am-12:00 pm
    • South African Zulu Music and Dance – Ikusasa Lethu (MMAP Gallery)
    • The Charanga Orchestra and Cuban Music – Jorge Maza with Típica Toronto and Brigido Galvan (Irwin’s Court)
    • 3:30 pm-5:00 pm
      • Newfoundland Song Traditions – Pat Byrne, Eleanor Dawson, Ellen Power (MMAP Gallery)

FILMS (tickets $5 each)

  • 5:45 – 7:00 PM
    • LIU Guiteng (China). The Drum Language: Ominan Ritual Music of Daur Ethnic Minority Shaman. 60 minutes.
      • Ominan is a ritual through which Daur shamans advance in their ranks. Shamans throughout the Hulunbuir Grassland (northeastern Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of China) wear divine hats decorated with antlers, whose numbers represent the rank of the shaman. The ritual is usually performed for three days during which a shaman proves his ability to communicate with the spiritual world. At the same time Ominan is also a divine banquet when clansmen gather together to sing, dance and offer sacrifices to thank their gods, therefore intensively reflecting Ominan Shaman music’s functions of epic narrating and creating a ritual atmosphere. This movie is the first documentary ever to study Daur Shaman ritual music from an ethnomusicological perspective. As an episode of the Chinese Shaman Ritual Music Study Series, this documentary was filmed during an actual Ominan ritual performed by Reverend Esiqinga, the most famous shaman, including records of divine songs, musical instruments, as well as the ritual process.

EXHIBIT (free admission)

  • Dr. Maud Karpeles: A Retrospective of Her Newfoundland Fieldwork, 1929 and 1930. Music Resource Centre, School of Music
    • A special exhibition on Maud Karpeles O.B.E. (1885-1976), her fieldwork in Newfoundland in 1929-30, and her contribution to the International Folk Music Council (the forerunner of ICTM) has been curated especially for ICTM 2011 by Dr. Anna Kearney Guigne. It is located in the Music Resource Centre of the School of Music, open to delegates during the conference except for the excursion day on Saturday. The exhibit was designed by ethnomusicologist Graham Blair.

A Whale of a Tale….With Hooks, Lines and Singers

July 14, 2011

A Whale of a Tale features close to 40 originally designed, traditional Newfoundland hooked rugs – all created by women from here and focused on the theme “The Power of Song.” The rugs tell a story that’s important to the individual(s) who created them.

The rugs are available for viewing and for sale in the upper concourse of the Arts and Culture Centre. Books are also for sale in the upper concourse. The book tells the story about each rug and has an added bonus of providing instruction about how to do traditional Newfoundland rug hooking.

You can also contact Five Island Art Gallery, Tors Cove, for more information: 334-3645 or 728-1532.

Program Updates

July 14, 2011

Good morning,

Below are the program updates as of Thursday, July 14. Items with an * are new as of today. Please update your programs and enjoy the conference!

PAPER CANCELLATIONS

*10H. Indigenous Responses to the Musical Legacies of Missionization.
Arts & Administration, Room 1046
Chair: Elaine KEILLOR (Canada)
»» Vít ZDRÁLEK (Czech Republic). “Whose Modernity? Performing Authority in Zion Christian Church, South Africa.”
»» Chad HAMILL (USA). “Catholic Expressions of Indigeneity: Indian Hymns of the Coeur d’Alene.”
»» Tom GORDON (Canada). “The Inuit Voice in Moravian Music.”
»» A.A. Idamoyibo ATINUKE (Nigeria). “Indigenous Modernities: The Systematic Development of Ijala Genre from the Hunters Chant to a Contemporary Genre in Christian Worship.”

6E. Northern Indigenous Popular Music.
Science, Room 2109
Chair: Beverley Diamond (Canada)
»» Véronique AUDET (Canada). “Why Do the Innu Sing Popular Music? Cultural Assertion, Healing and Identity Movements in Music.” [in French]
»» Andreas OTTE (Denmark). “Popular Music from Nuuk.”
»» Sophie STÉVANCE (Canada). “The Inuit Katajjaq in Popular Culture.” [in French]
»» Tom ARTISS (United Kingdom). “Approaching Music as ‘A Life’: Ethnographic Reflections from a Radio Station in Nain, Nunatsiavut.”

20G. Music Across the Atlantic.
Arts & Administration, Room 1046
Chair: Edwin SEROUSSI (Israel)
»» Anne CAUFRIEZ (Belgium). “The Music of Madeira Archipelego at the Crossroads of Atlantic Routes.”
»» Matthias STÖCKLI (Guatemala). “Sounds of War in Bernal Díaz de Castillo’s Account of the Spanish Conquest.”
»» Mike ANKLEWICZ (Canada). “The ‘Yiddish Atlantic’. Klezmer Migrations.”
»» Messod SALAMA (Canada). “Musical Counterfactum and Vestiges of Judeo-Spanish Liturgy among Canadian Sephardim: A Power Point
and Live Presentation.”

9J. Asian and Afro-Caribbean Musics: Concepts, Biomimetics, Improvisation and Ritual.
Arts & Administration, Room 1045
Chair: Ellen WATERMAN (Canada)
»» LIN Lijun (China). “A Field Record on the “Fire-walking” Ceremony at Yang’tou of the Pan’an County.”
»» Slawomira ŻERAŃSKA-KOMINEK (Poland). “Music as Process: Turkmen Bagshy’s Wandering in Space and Time.”
»» Kenneth SCHWEITZER (USA). “The Evolution of Improvisation in Ritual Batá Drumming.”
»» Paul D. ORMANDY (Canada). “Traditional Drumming of the Cayman Islands.”

5B. Archives, Memory and Community.
School of Music, Room 1032
Chair: Atesh SONNEBORN (USA)
»» Stephanie CONN (Canada). “Archive and Memory in Cape Breton Gaelic Singing.”
»» Frederick MOEHN (Portugal). “Curating Community at the Jazz Museum in Harlem.”
»» Genevieve CAMPBELL (Australia). “Ngarukuruwala: Returning Archived Recordings to the Tiwi Islands.”

 16B. Dialogic Knowledge Production: Ethics and Impact.
Bruneau Centre, Room 2001
Chair: Don NILES (Papua New Guinea)
»» Samuel ARAÚJO (Brazil). “Music, Politics, and Citizenship: The Scholar in the Public Sector.”
»» Eric Martin USNER (USA). “From Applied to Engaging Ethno/musicology: Pedagogies of Self, AesthEthics, Justice, and Love.”
»» Sarah ROSS (Switzerland). “Fieldwork between Heart and Brain, Imagination and Reality: Towards the Production and Representation of Jewish Musical Knowledge.”

4E. Individuals as Shapers of Modern Worlds.
Science, Room 2098
Chair: Sarah WEISS (USA)
»» Lillis Ó LAOIRE (Ireland). “Can the Subaltern Sing? The Indigenous, the Modern and the Career of Joe Heaney (1919-1984).”
»» Paul SMITH (Canada). “Reverend George Low and Sword Dancing in Shetland.”
»» Jennifer HILDEBRAND (USA). “Roland Hayes in Russia: Examining the Musical Crossroads of Nationality and the Folk.”
»» Ljerka V. RASMUSSEN (USA). “‘Sevdah is love’: Hanka Paldum, the Singer of Bosnia.”

21D. Changing Cultural Traditions in the Context of Life-Cycle Events.
Arts & Administration, Room 1043
Chair: Inna NARODITSKAYA (USA)
»» Inna NARODITSKAYA (USA). “Diasporic Weddings: An Ongoing Dance of Negotiation.”
»» Kapambwe LUMBWE (Zambia). “Indigenous Mfunkutu and Contemporary Ubwinga (Wedding) Music of the Bemba-speaking People: Continuity and Change.”
»» Fattakh KHALIG-ZADA (Azerbaijan). “Past and Present in a 21stcentury Baku Wedding Celebration.”

PAPER ADDITION

*9A. Popular Music’s Traditional Roots.
School of Music, PetroCanada Hall
Chair: Judith GRAY (USA)
»» TAKAMATSU Akiko (Japan). “Unity or Variety? British Traditional Ballads and their Development as Popular Music.”
»» Peter NARVÁEZ (Canada). “‘Running Bass’: An African-American Blues Guitar Figure that Contributed to the Development of Rock.”

»» Perminus Matiure (Zimbabwe). “The impact of modernity on the indigenous music of the Zezuru people of Zimbabwe: The case of mbira music.” 

 

SESSION CHANGES

*11A. Australian Indigenous Modernities.
School of Music, D.F. Cook Hall
Chair: Stephen WILD (Australia)
»»Steve Wanta Jampijinpa PATRICK and Yukihiro DOI (Australia). “Milpirri: Aboriginal Community Event that Joins the Ancient with the Contemporary.”
»»Aaron CORN (Australia). ‘The Garma Festival of Traditional Culture as Vehicle for Cultural Dynamism.”
»»Helen Rrikawuku YUNUPINGU (Australia). “Keeping Milkarri Strong: Documenting Yolngu Women’s Crying Songs in the Digital Age.”
»»Genevieve CAMPBELL (Australia). “The Ngarukuruwala Elders, Cultural Mediation and the Tiwi Strong Kids Song.”
TIME CHANGES

Friday, July 15: Study group on Historical Sources of Traditional Music (Chair: Ingrid Åkesson). School of Music, Room 2025 is meeting at 5:45, not 12:30

Sunday, July 17. Tran Quang Hai workshop in Arts and Culture Centre Gallery East is moved to 1:30.

*Sunday, July 17. Performing Arts of Southeast Asia study group will be meeting at 5:45pm. Room TBA.

CHAIR REPLACEMENTS

21 A. Globalization and Identity. School of Music, D.F. Cook Hall. Chair: Janet Sturman Larry Witzleben

4F. Post-Colonial Sound Ecologies in the South Atlantic. Arts & Administration, Room 1043. Chair:  Luis Figueiredo (Portugal) Salwa El-Shawan Castelo-Branco

ICTM & SOUNDshift Daily Events (July 14)

July 13, 2011

ICTM + SOUNDshift events open to the public

Thursday, July 14

 

 

CONCERT (Ticket $15/$10)

WORKSHOPS (tickets $10 each or 3 for $20)

  • 10:30 am-12:00 pm
    • Sámi Vocal Styles I – Frode Fjellheim and Ulla Pirttijärvi (Irwin’s Court)
    • Argentinian Chacarera Dance – Adriana Cerletti (MMAP Gallery)
    • 1:30 pm-3:00 pm
      • Newfoundland Set Dancing and Music – Jane Rutherford with Christina Smith (MMAP Gallery)
      • Native Contemporary Music – Dawn Avery (Irwin’s Court)

EXHIBIT (free admission)

  • Dr. Maud Karpeles: A Retrospective of Her Newfoundland Fieldwork, 1929 and 1930. Music Resource Centre, School of Music
    • A special exhibition on Maud Karpeles O.B.E. (1885-1976), her fieldwork in Newfoundland in 1929-30, and her contribution to the International Folk Music Council (the forerunner of ICTM) has been curated especially for ICTM 2011 by Dr. Anna Kearney Guigne. It is located in the Music Resource Centre of the School of Music, open to delegates during the conference except for the excursion day on Saturday. The exhibit was designed by ethnomusicologist Graham Blair.

 

Daily Program Updates

July 13, 2011

Below is the list of program updates and cancellations as of Wednesday morning. Please update your programs accordingly. Have a wonderful day and enjoy the conference!

PAPER CANCELLATIONS

6E. Northern Indigenous Popular Music.
Science, Room 2109
Chair: Beverley Diamond (Canada)
»» Véronique AUDET (Canada). “Why Do the Innu Sing Popular Music? Cultural Assertion, Healing and Identity Movements in Music.” [in French]
»» Andreas OTTE (Denmark). “Popular Music from Nuuk.”
»» Sophie STÉVANCE (Canada). “The Inuit Katajjaq in Popular Culture.” [in French]
»» Tom ARTISS (United Kingdom). “Approaching Music as ‘A Life’: Ethnographic Reflections from a Radio Station in Nain, Nunatsiavut.”

20G. Music Across the Atlantic.
Arts & Administration, Room 1046
Chair: Edwin SEROUSSI (Israel)
»» Anne CAUFRIEZ (Belgium). “The Music of Madeira Archipelego at the Crossroads of Atlantic Routes.”
»» Matthias STÖCKLI (Guatemala). “Sounds of War in Bernal Díaz de Castillo’s Account of the Spanish Conquest.”
»» Mike ANKLEWICZ (Canada). “The ‘Yiddish Atlantic’. Klezmer Migrations.”
»» Messod SALAMA (Canada). “Musical Counterfactum and Vestiges of Judeo-Spanish Liturgy among Canadian Sephardim: A Power Point
and Live Presentation.”

9J. Asian and Afro-Caribbean Musics: Concepts, Biomimetics, Improvisation and Ritual.
Arts & Administration, Room 1045
Chair: Ellen WATERMAN (Canada)
»» LIN Lijun (China). “A Field Record on the “Fire-walking” Ceremony at Yang’tou of the Pan’an County.”
»» Slawomira ŻERAŃSKA-KOMINEK (Poland). “Music as Process: Turkmen Bagshy’s Wandering in Space and Time.”
»» Kenneth SCHWEITZER (USA). “The Evolution of Improvisation in Ritual Batá Drumming.”
»» Paul D. ORMANDY (Canada). “Traditional Drumming of the Cayman Islands.”

 

5B. Archives, Memory and Community.
School of Music, Room 1032
Chair: Atesh SONNEBORN (USA)
»» Stephanie CONN (Canada). “Archive and Memory in Cape Breton Gaelic Singing.”
»» Frederick MOEHN (Portugal). “Curating Community at the Jazz Museum in Harlem.”
»» Genevieve CAMPBELL (Australia). “Ngarukuruwala: Returning Archived Recordings to the Tiwi Islands.”

 16B. Dialogic Knowledge Production: Ethics and Impact.
Bruneau Centre, Room 2001
Chair: Don NILES (Papua New Guinea)
»» Samuel ARAÚJO (Brazil). “Music, Politics, and Citizenship: The Scholar in the Public Sector.”
»» Eric Martin USNER (USA). “From Applied to Engaging Ethno/musicology: Pedagogies of Self, AesthEthics, Justice, and Love.”
»» Sarah ROSS (Switzerland). “Fieldwork between Heart and Brain, Imagination and Reality: Towards the Production and Representation of Jewish Musical Knowledge.”

4E. Individuals as Shapers of Modern Worlds.
Science, Room 2098
Chair: Sarah WEISS (USA)
»» Lillis Ó LAOIRE (Ireland). “Can the Subaltern Sing? The Indigenous, the Modern and the Career of Joe Heaney (1919-1984).”
»» Paul SMITH (Canada). “Reverend George Low and Sword Dancing in Shetland.”
»» Jennifer HILDEBRAND (USA). “Roland Hayes in Russia: Examining the Musical Crossroads of Nationality and the Folk.”
»» Ljerka V. RASMUSSEN (USA). “‘Sevdah is love’: Hanka Paldum, the Singer of Bosnia.”

21D. Changing Cultural Traditions in the Context of Life-Cycle Events.
Arts & Administration, Room 1043
Chair: Inna NARODITSKAYA (USA)
»» Inna NARODITSKAYA (USA). “Diasporic Weddings: An Ongoing Dance of Negotiation.”
»» Kapambwe LUMBWE (Zambia). “Indigenous Mfunkutu and Contemporary Ubwinga (Wedding) Music of the Bemba-speaking People: Continuity and Change.”
»» Fattakh KHALIG-ZADA (Azerbaijan). “Past and Present in a 21stcentury Baku Wedding Celebration.”

 TIME CHANGES

Friday, July 15: Study group on Historical Sources of Traditional Music (Chair: Ingrid Åkesson). School of Music, Room 2025 is meeting at 5:45, not 12:30

Sunday, July 17. Tran Quang Hai workshop in Arts and Culture Centre Gallery East is moved to 1:30.

CHAIR REPLACEMENTS

21 A. Globalization and Identity. School of Music, D.F. Cook Hall. Chair: Janet Sturman Larry Witzleben

4F. Post-Colonial Sound Ecologies in the South Atlantic. Arts & Administration, Room 1043. Chair:  Luis Figueiredo (Portugal) Salwa El-Shawan Castelo-Branco

 

ICTM & SOUNDshift Daily Events (July 13)

July 13, 2011

ICTM + SOUNDshift events open to the public

Wednesday, July 13

WORKSHOPS (tickets are $10 each or 3 for $20)

  • 10:30 am-12:00 pm
    • Fiddle and Identity I: Newfoundland Fiddle Styles – Charlie Cook, Christina Smith, Evelyn Osborne (Irwin’s Court)
    • Bluegrass in Canada – Neil V. Rosenberg, Graham Blair, and Marc Finch (MMAP Gallery)
    • 3:30 pm-5:00 pm
      • Song Roots/Routes – Anita Best, Jim Payne, Marilyn Tucker, Paul Wilson (Irwin’s Court)
      • Scottish Reels – Mats Melin (MMAP Gallery)

FILMS ($5 each)

  • 5:45 – 7:00 PM
    • Charlotte VIGNAU (Netherlands). The Alphorn. 52 minutes.
      • This video-film deals with issues of nationalism, migration and globalization, addressed through the phenomenon of the alphorn and its uses. The film first investigates “Swiss” aspects of alphorn-practice as well as distinctions within Switzerland between alphorn playing that is “official-Swiss, “creative-Swiss,” “playing like in the Alps” or in the cities, and creating a “Swiss sound.” The film then follows the migration of the alphorn phenomenon to the Netherlands, the Allgäu region (Germany) and Japan (Honshu island, where Tokyo and Osaka are situated). In all three cases alphorn-practice started to incorporate specific local as well as Swiss aspects.
      • Stephen SHEARON (USA). “I’ll Keep On Singing”: The Southern Gospel Convention Tradition. 55 minutes.
        • The contemporary southern U.S. gospel convention tradition is a tradition of amateur Christian music-making that developed in rural America following the Civil War (i.e., after 1865). It continued and eventually displaced in popularity the shape-note sacred music tradition that flourished prior to the Civil War (known by many today as the Sacred Harp tradition). Gospel convention music is written in a later, more-popular musical style, employs seven-shape notation, and uses instrumental accompaniment – in particular stride piano. Professional southern gospel music developed from it during the 20th century while amateur activity declined. Southern gospel convention singers today live generally in an arc running from West Virginia south and west to Texas. The documentary includes sections on convention singing, use of this music in churches, and connections with professional southern gospel, singing schools, and other aspects.

EXHIBIT (free admission)

  • Dr. Maud Karpeles: A Retrospective of Her Newfoundland Fieldwork, 1929 and 1930. Music Resource Centre, School of Music
    • A special exhibition on Maud Karpeles O.B.E. (1885-1976), her fieldwork in Newfoundland in 1929-30, and her contribution to the International Folk Music Council (the forerunner of ICTM) has been curated especially for ICTM 2011 by Dr. Anna Kearney Guigne. It is located in the Music Resource Centre of the School of Music, open to delegates during the conference except for the excursion day on Saturday. The exhibit was designed by ethnomusicologist Graham Blair.