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Thank you!!

July 20, 2011

A final post from the ICTM 2011/SOUNDshift blog.

Thanks to a veritable army of staff and volunteers, the conference and festival were a huge success! We hope that delegates enjoyed Newfoundland (despite the crazy weather!), the stimulating discussions during sessions, and the wonderful music and dance during our workshops and concerts. Thank you for braving long flights and multiple time zones (including our special 1/2 hour time zone in Newfoundland) to spend time with us here and join in the conference.

We are thrilled with our event and look forward to relaxing and enjoying ICTM 2013 in Shanghai, China.

ICTM & SOUNDshift Daily Events (19 July)

July 18, 2011

ICTM + SOUNDshift events open to the public

Tuesday, July 19


 

WORKSHOPS ($10 each or 3 for $20)

  • 10:30am-12:00 pm
    • Newfoundland Accordion Styles – Aaron Collis, Art Stoyles and Bob Rutherford, The Sweet Forget-Me-Nots (Irwin’s Court)
    • Sephardic Song – Judith Cohen (Gallery East)
    • Fiddle and Identity II – Colin Quigley, Kelly Russell, Pierre Schryer (MMAP Gallery)
    • 1:30 pm-3:00 pm
      • From Montmagny to St. John’s: Accordion Music of Quebec and Newfoundland – Raynald Ouellet, Graham Wells (Irwin’s Court)
      • Percussive Dance – Kristin Harris Walsh, Normand Legault, Mats Melin, Stan Pickett (MMAP Gallery)

FILMS ($5 each)

  • 8:30 – 10:30 AM
    • Ryan Koons (USA). People of One Fire Continuing a Centuries-Old Tradition: Winter.40 mins
      • This film examines two ceremonial gatherings celebrated by Pine Arbor Tribal Town. Located in northern Florida, this Muskogee-Creek Native American community traces an unbroken line of precolonial traditions that include two formerly little-known winter gatherings: the Harvest Busk and the Soup Dance. Scholars such as William Bartram and John Swanton have studied the Creek Green Corn Busk, but never these two winter celebrations. This documentary is therefore an introduction, both to a private Native American community with a rich heritage, and to two of its previously unstudied ceremonies and the accompanying music and dance. Created in conjunction with Pine Arbor, this documentary is based on field research conducted between 2008 and 2010. While discussing the two ceremonies, it details cosmology, functions of music and dance, musically-generated dance, season-specific music, and gender relations.
      • Patrick ALCEDO (Canada). Panaad: A Promise To The Santo Niño.18 mins
        • In the Aklanon language of the Philippines, panaad means a religious promise that has to be fulfilled as long as humanly possible. Through annual participation in the Ati-atihan festival of Kalibo, Aklan, teacher Augusto Diangson, balikbayan (Filipino returnee) Cecile Motus, and businessman Henry Villanueva dance in the streets in order to stay true to the vow they made many years ago to the Santo Niño, the Holy Child Jesus. By transforming themselves into extraordinary beings and willing their performances as acts of prayer, they believe the Santo Niño will continue to descend into their lives not only to reward them with blessings but also to imbue them with a sense of His presence on the ground. The film traces the festival in the lives of these three participants to reveal how they show thanks to and hold steady their belief in the Santo Niño, symbol of the foreign faith they have localized and then choreographed into modernity.
        • Aaron CARTER-COHN (USA). Texas Celebrates the 50th Anniversary of Nigerian Independence.20 mins
          • On October 1st, 1960, Nigeria claimed its independence from England. This was more than a declaration of self-government; it was a reclamation of indigenous culture and a statement of cultural freedom. Today, Houston is home to what is widely cited as the largest concentration of Nigerians living in the United States. Various expatriate organizations celebrate Nigerian Independence Day with parties, parades and picnics. 2010 marked the 50th Anniversary for many African nations including Nigeria. This documentary focuses on music and dance in this diasporic and immigrant culture.

EXHIBIT (free admission)

  • Dr. Maud Karpeles: A Retrospective of Her Newfoundland Fieldwork, 1929 and 1930. Music Resource Centre, School of Music
    • A special exhibition on Maud Karpeles O.B.E. (1885-1976), her fieldwork in Newfoundland in 1929-30, and her contribution to the International Folk Music Council (the forerunner of ICTM) has been curated especially for ICTM 2011 by Dr. Anna Kearney Guigne. It is located in the Music Resource Centre of the School of Music, open during the conference except for the excursion day on Saturday. The exhibit was designed by ethnomusicologist Graham Blair.

Daily Program Updates

July 18, 2011

Good morning,

Below are the program updates as of Monday, July 18. Items with an * are new as of today. Please update your programs and enjoy the conference!

PAPER CANCELLATIONS AND REPLACEMENTS

*20G. Music Across the Atlantic.
Arts & Administration, Room 1046
Chair: Edwin SEROUSSI (Israel)
»» Anne CAUFRIEZ (Belgium). “The Music of Madeira Archipelego at the Crossroads of Atlantic Routes.”
»» Luiz Henrique FIAMMENGHI “Warrior Maiden: Cultural Juxstaposition and Hybridization as Creative Process.

»» Matthias STÖCKLI (Guatemala). “Sounds of War in Bernal Díaz de Castillo’s Account of the Spanish Conquest.”
»» Mike ANKLEWICZ (Canada). “The ‘Yiddish Atlantic’. Klezmer Migrations.”
»» Messod SALAMA (Canada). “Musical Counterfactum and Vestiges of Judeo-Spanish Liturgy among Canadian Sephardim: A Power Point and Live Presentation.”

16B. Dialogic Knowledge Production: Ethics and Impact.
Bruneau Centre, Room 2001
Chair: Don NILES (Papua New Guinea)
»» Samuel ARAÚJO (Brazil). “Music, Politics, and Citizenship: The Scholar in the Public Sector.”
»» Eric Martin USNER (USA). “From Applied to Engaging Ethno/musicology: Pedagogies of Self, AesthEthics, Justice, and Love.”
»» Sarah ROSS (Switzerland). “Fieldwork between Heart and Brain, Imagination and Reality: Towards the Production and Representation of Jewish Musical Knowledge.”

13A. Indigenous Modernities, Musics and Media.
School of Music, PetroCanada Hall
Chair: M. Celia CAIN (Canada)
»» Klisala HARRISON (Canada). “Third Texts in Indigenous Performance: The Silent Film.”
»» Elyse CARTER VOSEN (USA). “Justice Hunters: Negotiation and Resistance in Indigenous Popular Music.”
»» M. Celia CAIN (Canada). “‘This is the music I know’: Producing Canadian Indigenous Popular Music Television.”

10H. Indigenous Responses to the Musical Legacies of Missionization.
Arts & Administration, Room 1046
Chair: Elaine KEILLOR (Canada)
»» Vít ZDRÁLEK (Czech Republic). “Whose Modernity? Performing Authority in Zion Christian Church, South Africa.”
»» Chad HAMILL (USA). “Catholic Expressions of Indigeneity: Indian Hymns of the Coeur d’Alene.”
»» Tom GORDON (Canada). “The Inuit Voice in Moravian Music.”
»» A.A. Idamoyibo ATINUKE (Nigeria). “Indigenous Modernities: The Systematic Development of Ijala Genre from the Hunters Chant to a Contemporary Genre in Christian Worship.”

6E. Northern Indigenous Popular Music.
Science, Room 2109
Chair: Beverley Diamond (Canada)
»» Véronique AUDET (Canada). “Why Do the Innu Sing Popular Music? Cultural Assertion, Healing and Identity Movements in Music.” [in French]
»» Andreas OTTE (Denmark). “Popular Music from Nuuk.”
»» Sophie STÉVANCE (Canada). “The Inuit Katajjaq in Popular Culture.” [in French]
»» Tom ARTISS (United Kingdom). “Approaching Music as ‘A Life’: Ethnographic Reflections from a Radio Station in Nain, Nunatsiavut.”

20G. Music Across the Atlantic.
Arts & Administration, Room 1046
Chair: Edwin SEROUSSI (Israel)
»» Anne CAUFRIEZ (Belgium). “The Music of Madeira Archipelego at the Crossroads of Atlantic Routes.”
»» Matthias STÖCKLI (Guatemala). “Sounds of War in Bernal Díaz de Castillo’s Account of the Spanish Conquest.”
»» Mike ANKLEWICZ (Canada). “The ‘Yiddish Atlantic’. Klezmer Migrations.”
»» Messod SALAMA (Canada). “Musical Counterfactum and Vestiges of Judeo-Spanish Liturgy among Canadian Sephardim: A Power Point
and Live Presentation.”

9J. Asian and Afro-Caribbean Musics: Concepts, Biomimetics, Improvisation and Ritual.
Arts & Administration, Room 1045
Chair: Ellen WATERMAN (Canada)
»» LIN Lijun (China). “A Field Record on the “Fire-walking” Ceremony at Yang’tou of the Pan’an County.”
»» Slawomira ŻERAŃSKA-KOMINEK (Poland). “Music as Process: Turkmen Bagshy’s Wandering in Space and Time.”
»» Kenneth SCHWEITZER (USA). “The Evolution of Improvisation in Ritual Batá Drumming.”
»» Paul D. ORMANDY (Canada). “Traditional Drumming of the Cayman Islands.”

5B. Archives, Memory and Community.
School of Music, Room 1032
Chair: Atesh SONNEBORN (USA)
»» Stephanie CONN (Canada). “Archive and Memory in Cape Breton Gaelic Singing.”
»» Frederick MOEHN (Portugal). “Curating Community at the Jazz Museum in Harlem.”
»» Genevieve CAMPBELL (Australia). “Ngarukuruwala: Returning Archived Recordings to the Tiwi Islands.”

 16B. Dialogic Knowledge Production: Ethics and Impact.
Bruneau Centre, Room 2001
Chair: Don NILES (Papua New Guinea)
»» Samuel ARAÚJO (Brazil). “Music, Politics, and Citizenship: The Scholar in the Public Sector.”
»» Eric Martin USNER (USA). “From Applied to Engaging Ethno/musicology: Pedagogies of Self, AesthEthics, Justice, and Love.”
»» Sarah ROSS (Switzerland). “Fieldwork between Heart and Brain, Imagination and Reality: Towards the Production and Representation of Jewish Musical Knowledge.”

4E. Individuals as Shapers of Modern Worlds.
Science, Room 2098
Chair: Sarah WEISS (USA)
»» Lillis Ó LAOIRE (Ireland). “Can the Subaltern Sing? The Indigenous, the Modern and the Career of Joe Heaney (1919-1984).”
»» Paul SMITH (Canada). “Reverend George Low and Sword Dancing in Shetland.”
»» Jennifer HILDEBRAND (USA). “Roland Hayes in Russia: Examining the Musical Crossroads of Nationality and the Folk.”
»» Ljerka V. RASMUSSEN (USA). “‘Sevdah is love’: Hanka Paldum, the Singer of Bosnia.”

21D. Changing Cultural Traditions in the Context of Life-Cycle Events.
Arts & Administration, Room 1043
Chair: Inna NARODITSKAYA (USA)
»» Inna NARODITSKAYA (USA). “Diasporic Weddings: An Ongoing Dance of Negotiation.”
»» Kapambwe LUMBWE (Zambia). “Indigenous Mfunkutu and Contemporary Ubwinga (Wedding) Music of the Bemba-speaking People: Continuity and Change.”
»» Fattakh KHALIG-ZADA (Azerbaijan). “Past and Present in a 21stcentury Baku Wedding Celebration.”

PAPER ADDITION

9A. Popular Music’s Traditional Roots.
School of Music, PetroCanada Hall
Chair: Judith GRAY (USA)
»» TAKAMATSU Akiko (Japan). “Unity or Variety? British Traditional Ballads and their Development as Popular Music.”
»» Peter NARVÁEZ (Canada). “‘Running Bass’: An African-American Blues Guitar Figure that Contributed to the Development of Rock.”

»» Perminus Matiure (Zimbabwe). “The impact of modernity on the indigenous music of the Zezuru people of Zimbabwe: The case of mbira music.” 

SESSION CHANGES

11A. Australian Indigenous Modernities.
School of Music, D.F. Cook Hall
Chair: Stephen WILD (Australia)
»»Steve Wanta Jampijinpa PATRICK and Yukihiro DOI (Australia). “Milpirri: Aboriginal Community Event that Joins the Ancient with the Contemporary.”
»»Aaron CORN (Australia). ‘The Garma Festival of Traditional Culture as Vehicle for Cultural Dynamism.”
»»Helen Rrikawuku YUNUPINGU (Australia). “Keeping Milkarri Strong: Documenting Yolngu Women’s Crying Songs in the Digital Age.”
»»Genevieve CAMPBELL (Australia). “The Ngarukuruwala Elders, Cultural Mediation and the Tiwi Strong Kids Song.”

TIME CHANGES

Friday, July 15: Study group on Historical Sources of Traditional Music (Chair: Ingrid Åkesson). School of Music, Room 2025 is meeting at 5:45, not 12:30

Sunday, July 17. Tran Quang Hai workshop in Arts and Culture Centre Gallery East is moved to 1:30.

Sunday, July 17. Performing Arts of Southeast Asia study group will be meeting at 5:45pm. Room TBA.

CHAIR REPLACEMENTS

*20B.  Negotiation and Competition as Musical Processes. School of Music, Room 1032 Chair: Klissala Harrison Elyse CARTER-VOSEN (USA)

21 A. Globalization and Identity. School of Music, D.F. Cook Hall. Chair: Janet Sturman Larry Witzleben

4F. Post-Colonial Sound Ecologies in the South Atlantic. Arts & Administration, Room 1043. Chair:  Luis Figueiredo (Portugal) Salwa El-Shawan Castelo-Branco

CONCERT CANCELLATION

Feast of Asia. D. F. Cook Recital Hall.

OTHER ADDITIONS

CSTM open mic, D. F. Cook Hall, Sunday 5:45-7:00pm.

ICTM & SOUNDshift Daily Events (18 July)

July 17, 2011

ICTM + SOUNDshift events open to the public

Monday, July 18

 

 

CONCERT (tickets $25/15)

  • CANADA’S MANY VOICES (Monday 18 July, 8:00pm; Arts & Culture Centre) showcases cultural diversity from coast to coast.

WORKSHOPS ($10 each or 3 for $20)

  • 10:30 am-12:00 pm
    • Dance Styles in Chinese Opera – William Lau (MMAP Gallery)
    • Sámi Vocal Styles II – Frode Fjellheim and Ulla Pirttijärvi (Gallery East)
    • The Music of Matou (Irwin’s Court)
    • 3:30 pm-5:00 pm
      • Inuit Vocal Styles – Jennie Williams and Tama Fost (MMAP Gallery)
      • Newfoundland Ugly Stick Making – Grenfell Letto, with host Dale Jarvis (Irwin’s Court)

FILMS ($5 each)

  • 8:30 – 9:30 AM
    • Enrique Cámara de LANDA (Spain). Non morirà mai: el tango italiano en cuatro movimientos.Buenos Aires, centro feca, 2010. 74 mins
      • The history of the Italian tango is tackled in this video. The historical phases of this musical and dance genre (reception, songs during the fascist, liscio, and postmodern periods) are narrated here in Spanish language, and many documents are shown to illustrate the information provided.
      • 3:30 – 5:30 PM
        • Sandrine Loncke (France). Dance with the Wodaabes.90 minutes
          • In the heart of the Nigerien Sahel, far off the beaten “asphalt” track, thousands of Fulbe Wodaabe nomads come together every year for a vast ceremonial gathering named the geerewol. For seven full days and nights, following the solar cycle, two lineages are opposed in a genuine ritual war, with for only weapons song and dance.The stakes of war, the clear challenge: stealing women.The ultimate purpose: to break in peace after having mutually expressed recognition of cultural conformity. For the Wodaabes, this is a gathering where community links are woven. A result of ten years’ research and friendship, the film is based on an active dialogical relationship with the ritual’s protagonists who chose to disclose the deep meaning of this tradition to us, since the ecological crisis striking Sahel makes such gatherings less and less likely in the future.
          • 5:45 – 7:00 PM
            • Timothy RICE (USA). May It Fill Your Soul.55 minutes
              • This documentary film concerns two outstanding Bulgarian traditional musicians who immigrated to the United States in 2001: Ivan Varimezov, a player of the bagpipe (gaida), and his wife Tzvetanka, a singer, player of the plucked lute (tambura), and director of women’s choirs. The film documents their trajectory of success and struggle, joy and pain, nostalgia and hope. From a European point of view the main theme of this film is emigration. Since Bulgaria emerged from a 45-year period (1944-1989) of Communist-Party rule, it has experienced a huge brain drain as its best and brightest, including outstanding musicians such as the Varimezovs, have sought their fortunes abroad. Those who remain are variously curious, envious, jealous, proud, and scornful of those who have left. Since the Varimezovs are bearers of a musical tradition with strong bonds to their national identity, their leaving is particularly problematic for the nation. From an American point of view, the main theme of this film is immigration. It suggests a set of universal questions with particular answers. Why do people leave their home country? How do they adapt to their new one? Is there an emotional tension or conflict between love of home and hearth and the people they leave behind, on one hand, and the desire or necessity to make a new life in a new country, on the other? How is this tension, which seems inevitable, dealt with practically? Can it ever be resolved or does it even need to be? Can the tension be productive? What is the role of music in mediating these tensions?

PRESENTATION (free admission)

  • Keynote: Dr. Michelle Bigenho, “The Intimate Distance of Indigenous Modernity” (Monday, July 18 from 1:30-3:00pm at the Arts and Culture Centre main theatre, FREE)
    • Celebrated American ethnomusicologist and anthropologist Michelle Bigenho has been named keynote speaker as part of the 2011 International Council of Traditional Music (ICTM) conference. Dr. Michelle Bigenho’s work examines the cultural politics of Bolivian music performances as they relate to nationalism, discourses of authenticity, indigeneity, folklorization, cultural property and globalization.

EXHIBIT (free admission)

  • Dr. Maud Karpeles: A Retrospective of Her Newfoundland Fieldwork, 1929 and 1930. Music Resource Centre, School of Music
    • A special exhibition on Maud Karpeles O.B.E. (1885-1976), her fieldwork in Newfoundland in 1929-30, and her contribution to the International Folk Music Council (the forerunner of ICTM) has been curated especially for ICTM 2011 by Dr. Anna Kearney Guigne. It is located in the Music Resource Centre of the School of Music. The exhibit was designed by ethnomusicologist Graham Blair.

Program Updates – Sunday

July 17, 2011

The following are all NEW changes. Please update your programs and enjoy the conference!

8:30 – 10:00 —  13A. Elyse Carter Vosen – CANCELLED

10:30 – 12:00/12:30 – 14M Tran Quang Hai   workshop – moved to 1:30 in MMaP Gallery – ROOM CHANGE

10:30 – 12:00/12:30 – 14J – Films moved to D.F. Cook Hall – ROOM CHANGE

1:30 – 3:00 – Tran Quang Hai workshop – MMaP Gallery – TIME CHANGE

3:30 – 5:30 – 16B – Eric Usner – CANCELLED

5:45 – 7:00 – Feast of Asia concert – CANCELLED

5:45 – 7:00 –  CSTM/SCTM Open Mic in Petro Canada Hall – ADDED

Change for Sunday

July 17, 2011

14J Films, Sunday, 10:30 – 12:00 has been moved to D. F. Cook Hall.

ICTM & SOUNDshift Daily Events (17 July)

July 16, 2011

ICTM + SOUNDshift events open to the public

Sunday, July 17

 

 

CONCERT (Tickets $25/15)

  • INDIGENOUS NOW! shines the spotlight on well-known Native American groups, a trans-national indigenous ensemble and a Sámi duo who add jazz and popular music elements to the tradition of “joiking”; (characterizing people, places, or animals in song).

WORKSHOPS (tickets $10 each or 3 for $20)

  • 10:30 am-12:00 pm
    • Singing the West: Traditional Songs and Songs in the Tradition from the Prairies and British Columbia – E. David and Rosaleen Gregory, John Leeder (Irwin’s Court)
    • Haudenosaunee Social Dance and Music – Six Nations Women Singers (MMAP Gallery)
    • 1:30 pm-3:00 pm
      • Tuvan Overtone Singing – Tran Quang Hai (Gallery East)
      • Taiko Drumming Techniques – Uzume Taiko (Irwin’s Court)
      • Georgian Polyphony – Zari (Gallery East)
      • 3:30 pm-5:00 pm
        • Arabic Rhythms and Modes -The Traditional Arabic Music Ensemble (Irwin’s Court)
        • Tango – Adriana Cerletti, Silvia Citro (MMAP Gallery)
        • Australian Indigenous Songs. Arts & Culture Centre, Gallery East

FILMS (tickets $5 each)

  • 10:30 AM – 12:00 NOON
    • Aaron CARTER-COHN(USA). At Home with Music: Burundian Refugees in América. 20 minutes.
      • In San Antonio, you will find world music in an unlikely place: a mid-sized Episcopal church that hosts an annual World Refugee Day event that routinely attracts over 1000 people. Out of this event emerged a Pentecostal congregation of Burundian refugees who fled their country during the civil war of 1992 and who needed facilities where they could make music. Burundi is known for drumming, but you will not find amashako, ibishikiso, or ikiranya drums here. Amongst the Burundian refugees in San Antonio, electric bass and guitar or MIDI disks are the choice accompaniments. The only remnants of tradition are the singing and dancing that is integral to music in Africa. Spanning a year, the film highlights acquisitions of new instruments and equipment, hitherto unavailable, demonstrating how new tools change music and dance practice. Interviews are conducted in French; singing is in Kirundi, Swahili and other African languages; English subtitles are included.
      • NGUYEN Thuy Tien (Vietnam). Vietnamese Hiphop in a Dialogue With the Past.20 minutes
        • In Vietnam, hiphop was imported during the 1990s and quickly attracted a massive student community, despite the indifference of state institutions and attempts at suppression by the parents. At the beginning, hiphop was completely imitative of other models but by 2000, with an experiment based on xam background music, the hiphop youth began returning to their roots. The hiphop community and musical researchers started a dialogue about traditional music as it bridges generations. The project is primarily based on three genres representing three regions of Vietnam: Ca trù of the North, Central Highlands’ gong and Southern Tài tu music.

PRESENTATION (free admission)

  • Safeguarding living culture – the state of affairs as regards the 2003 UNESCO convention (Sunday July 17 from 1:30-3:00pm @ Arts and Culture Centre main theatre)
    • The 2003 UNESCO convention for the safeguarding of the intangible cultural heritage (ICH, living culture) has now been operating in full swing since 2008, after establishing its operational directives, etc. In this panel we would like to look at the results so far and suggest solutions for current problems. In this panel we want to look critically to what safeguarding living culture means in the context of the 2003 UNESCO convention. We shall address some general questions and also look into regional implications. After several short introductions by the panelists (together about 45 minutes), we invite you to take part in the general discussion.

EXHIBIT (free admission)

  • Dr. Maud Karpeles: A Retrospective of Her Newfoundland Fieldwork, 1929 and 1930. Music Resource Centre, School of Music
    • A special exhibition on Maud Karpeles O.B.E. (1885-1976), her fieldwork in Newfoundland in 1929-30, and her contribution to the International Folk Music Council (the forerunner of ICTM) has been curated especially for ICTM 2011 by Dr. Anna Kearney Guigne. It is located in the Music Resource Centre of the School of Music, open to delegates during the conference except for the excursion day on Saturday. The exhibit was designed by ethnomusicologist Graham Blair.
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